Learning Materials

On this page you can find pre-made lesson plans, worksheets and educational materials which are free to use. Each of the lessons aims to explore women’s work in the 19th century and, where possible, includes a focus on digital research. Each lesson plan encourages students to undertake independent research and thought, while also providing opportunities for group work and discussion.

You are free to re-use, duplicate and distribute the worksheets as you wish, but please do credit this site. If you do use the resources, please take a second to leave a comment below, I appreciate your feedback!

NB. While every effort has been made to target these resources and their content appropriately, teachers should of course review them prior to use.

All readers of this site would probably benefit from reading my definition of “Occupation” – which informs much of the work on this site. Read it Here

Key Stage 1


Key Stage 2

This source analysis help-sheet introduces the basics of source analysis at an accessible level. Some students may need some assistance in interpreting this sheet at KS2, but it provides a framework ideal as a teaching aid.
Source Analysis Help sheet

 


GCSE

This source analysis help-sheet is ideal for GCSE level students, and could be used as a guide for an independent activity or homework task.
Source Analysis Help sheet

This overview of my appearance on Who do you think you are? with Sir Ian McKellen is a useful example both of how history is still relevant today, and how research can still yield new information even today.
Read it here.

The episode of Who do you think you are? I appeared in alongside Sir Ian McKellen is availible on BBC iPlayer. This episode is excellent for engaging students, since most will be familiar with Sir Ian. Also an excellent primer on genealogical methods.
Watch it here.

(Nb. Teachers are free to play BBC programmes to their classes for educational purposes. The playing or performing of copyright works, including sound recordings, in the course of the activities of educational establishments, do not infringe copyright.)

 


 

A-Level

This source analysis help-sheet can be useful as a quick reference sheet for A-level students.
Source Analysis Help sheet 

This article on defining the term “occupation” can be helpful in providing a template for the consideration of the more esoteric aspects of studying history and higher level thinking.
Read it Here

The following article, which I wrote for The Guardian is an easy to read overview of my research, and a good introduction to women’s work in Victorian England.
Read the article

The episode of Who do you think you are? I appeared in alongside Sir Ian McKellen is available on BBC iPlayer. This episode is excellent for engaging students, since most will be familiar with Sir Ian. Also an excellent primer on genealogical methods.
Watch it here.

(Nb. Teachers are free to play BBC programmes to their classes for educational purposes. The playing or performing of copyright works, including sound recordings, in the course of the activities of educational establishments, do not infringe copyright.)

 


 

BA / MA

In the first instance, aspiring and professional historians should read my definition of “occupation” as used for this site – since this informs much of the selection process for the articles presented here.
Read it Here

University level students and researchers interested in 19th century occupations will find the I-CeM database available through the University of Essex highly useful.

  • I-CeM  –  Explore and download census records, digitised and harmonised from the original enumeration books, detailing characteristics for all individuals resident in Great Britain at each census from 1851 to 1911 (Requires Higher education login)
  • I-CeM Learning resources –  A support site for students and researchers getting to grips with the array of data supplied by I-CeM!

The following article i wrote for The Guardian is useful as a quick introduction to my field of study, but also as an example of public history writing.
Read the article

Those interested in I-CeM in particular will find the following guide to be a useful source of advanced information:  Amanda Wilkinson, Edward Higgs, Christine Jones, and Kevin Schürer (2013) The Integrated Census Microdata (I-CeM)
Available to download Here.

The episode of Who do you think you are? I appeared in alongside Sir Ian McKellen is available on BBC iPlayer. This can be used as an example of public history engagement and of the commercial applications of research.
Watch it here.

You can also find a list of my most recent academic publications
Here