Tag: Victorian occupations

G is for Gloveress

‘Gloving is only a cloak for something worse; to be a gloveress is enough to stamp them with no enviable fame.’[1] In 1852, the anonymous, ‘Humanitas’ wrote to Reynold’s Newspaper in an attempt to bring to the attention of the public the terrible state in which many gloveresses found themselves. To be a gloveress a… Read more »

F is for Fur Puller

Today, the wearing of fur is uncommon. However, in Victorian society it was commonplace among the middle and upper classes.  Everybody from small babies to the elderly wore fur. The coats of the military fighting in the Crimea were lined with rabbit fur leading to many more women entering the profession as seen in a… Read more »

E is for Embroideress

When deciding which predominantly female occupation to write about for the E in our alphabet I had to make a difficult decision between Envelope Folder and Embroideress. There are, of course, a surprisingly large number of other ‘E’s in the census – Errand girls were frequently recorded, Eating House Keepers, a couple of Electric Primer… Read more »

D is for Dressmaker

Wherever you look in the Victorian censuses, whether it be the urban metropolis of London, or the sleepiest villages in deepest Norfolk you will always find women recorded as either ‘dressmaker’, ‘tailoress’, ‘shirt maker/sewer’ or ‘needlewoman’. Mid-century, estimate placed the number of dressmakers in London alone as being in the region of 15-17,000 women. In… Read more »